Category: Politics

Is Capitalism Moral

Is Capitalism Moral?New Video with economist Walter Williams! -> “Is Capitalism Moral?”Is capitalism moral or greedy? If it’s based on greed and selfishness, what’s the best alternative economic system? Perhaps socialism? And if capitalism is moral, what makes it so?Walter E. Williams – Townhall.com Columnist

Posted by PragerU on Monday, September 14, 2015

What Did Saunders Get Wrong About How A Bill Is Passed In Mr. Smith?

For AP Students who were’t paying attention during the movie and who are googling what mistakes Sauders made when describing how a bill becomes a law to Jeff Smith in Mr. Smith Goes To Washington.

The Transcript:

JEFFERSON
(laughing a little)
Oh—dinner. Yes. Well, I’m hungry,
too. I thought—maybe—we could have
something brought in—you know, like
big executives who eat off trays.
You see, we’ve got to light into
this and get it going—

SAUNDERS
Uh-huh. Well, dinner comes in on
trays. We’re executives. And we light
into this. It is dawn. Your Bill is
ready. You go over there and introduce
it—

JEFFERSON
How?

SAUNDERS
You get to your feet in the Senate
and present it. Then you take the
Bill and put it in a little box—
like a letter box—on the side of
the rostrum. Just hold it between
thumb and forefinger and drop it in.
Clerks read it and refer it to the
right committee—

JEFFERSON
Committee, huh?

SAUNDERS
Committee.

JEFFERSON
Why?

SAUNDERS
That’s how Congress—or any large
body—is run. All work has to be
done by committee.

JEFFERSON
Why?

SAUNDERS
Look—committees—small groups of
Senators—have to sift a Bill down—
look into it—study it—and report
to the whole Senate. You can’t take
a Bill no one knows anything about
and discuss it among ninety-six men.
Where would you get?

JEFFERSON
Yes, I see that.

SAUNDERS
Good. Where are we?

JEFFERSON
Some committee’s got it.

SAUNDERS
Yes. They give it to a *sub*-
committee, where they really give it
a going over—hold hearings—call in
people and ask questions—then report
back to the bigger committee—where
it’s considered some more, changed,
amended, or whatever. Days are going
by, Senator. Days—weeks. Finally,
they think it’s quite a Bill. It
goes over to the House of
Representatives for debate and a
vote. *But* it’s got to wait its
turn on the calendar—

JEFFERSON
Calendar?

SAUNDERS
That’s the order of business. Your
Bill has to stand *way* back there
in line unless the Steering Committee
decides it is important enough to be—

JEFFERSON
What’s that?

SAUNDERS
What?

JEFFERSON
The Steering Committee.

SAUNDERS
(depressed)
Do you really think we’re getting
anywhere.

JEFFERSON
Yes. Sure. What’s a Steering
Committee?

SAUNDERS
A committee of the majority party
leaders. They decide when a Bill is
important enough to be moved up toward
the head of the list—

JEFFERSON
*This* is.

SAUNDERS
Pardon me—*this* is. Where are we
now?

JEFFERSON
We’re over in the House.

SAUNDERS
Yes. House. More amendments—more
changes—and the Bill goes back to
the Senate—and *waits its turn on
the calendar again*. The Senate
doesn’t like what the house did to
the Bill. They make more changes.
The House doesn’t like *those*
changes. Stymie. So they appoint men
from each house to go into a huddle
called a conference and battle it
out. Besides that, all the lobbyists
interested give cocktail parties for
and against—government departments
get in their two cents’ worth—cabinet
members—budget bureaus—embassies.
Finally, if the Bill is alive after
all this vivisection, it comes to a
vote. Yes, sir—the big day finally
arrives. And—nine times out of ten,
they vote it down.
(Taking a deep breath)
Are you catching on, Senator?

JEFFERSON
Yes. Shall we start on it right now—
or order dinner first?

SAUNDERS
(mouth drops open)
Pardon?

JEFFERSON
I said—shall we get started *now*
or—

SAUNDERS
(weakly)
Yes—sure. Why not?
(Then, very tired)
You don’t mind if I take the time to
get a pencil?

She turns mechanically and heads for the outer office.

_______

Here’s a good reference for how a bill becomes a law.

Remember, that omitting a detail is not necessarily a mistake. Saunders was summarizing.

Lack of Skilled Workers Threatens Recovery

Welcome Instapundit fans. While I normally write about golf, as you can see on the main pages, the GolfBlogger 19th Hole is my outlet for other writing. Before becoming a public school teacher, I worked for The Heritage Foundation, so my leanings are definitely conservative … 

The post you want to see is below:

******

From a recent Yahoo Finance article:

Workers with specialized skills like electricians, carpenters and welders are in critically short supply in many large economies, a shortfall that marks another obstacle to the global economic recovery, a research paper by Manpower Inc (NYSE:MAN – News) concludes.

“It becomes a real choke-point in future economic growth,” Manpower Chief Executive Jeff Joerres said. “We believe strongly this is really an issue in the labor market.”

As a public school teacher, I’ve been saying for some time that the entire “No Child Left Behind – Every Kid Has To Go To College” mentality would have just this sort of negative, and unintended consequence. Public High school used to have big shop departments—woodshop, auto repair, plumbing, welding, etc. Now, the government’s emphasis on high-stakes academic tests in measuring school quality has resulted in reduction or elimination of non-academic classes. Students are being told that college is their only hope.

It all makes sense from the school’s point of view. Schools need students to buy into the college mentality so they will concentrate on the sort of knowledge and skills that will help them score well on standardized academic tests (in Michigan, that’s the ACT for high school students). Students scores on standardized tests determine whether a school is deemed to meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) or is failing. Failing schools suffer a number of sanctions, none of which are pleasant for administrators or teachers.

College prep classes help schools meet AYP and avoid sanctions. Shop classes do not. So the shop classes have to go.

You really can’t blame the schools, though. The Federal Government has set the rules and public schools are simply playing the game. This is just another example of the failure of top down government.

Rather than having the federal government dictate children’s futures, parents and students should have a wide variety of educational avenues available. The truth is that not every kid is meant to go to college, and not every kid should. The trades are honorable, worthwhile, and profitable. Trades require intelligence, hard work and professionalism. As a society, we need tradesmen.

And frankly, tradesmen make more than most college-educated public school teachers. smile

Political Lightbulb Jokes

This was emailed to me, so I have no ideas as to the source. But I thought it was a nice explanation of the various US political factions:

How many conservatives does it take to change a light bulb?

The old one was fine. You must be some kind of pinko commie socialist liberal if you want to change it.

How many liberals does it take to change a light bulb?

Only strong government regulation can save us from a recurrence of the “burned out light-bulb” problem.

How many centrists does it take to change a light bulb?

The light bulb problem is caused by the ideological rift in our society between left and right, and if only people were more reasonable it would have been changed long ago.

How many feminists does it take to change a light bulb?

Why do I have to change the light bulb?

How many libertarians does it take to change a light bulb?

Don’t worry about it. Market forces will take care of it.

How many environmentalists does it take to change a light bulb?

No light bulb, no carbon emissions. It’s better if you don’t change it.